Planting Bulbs Inside

Planting Bulbs Inside

I have bulbs that seemingly pop up out of nowhere every year in my yard. It’s an amazing feat actually, as I do absolutely nothing to care for them. Over the years I have popped a few here and there and every spring it’s a joy to see where they will pop up!

I know in some climates in the U.S., people actually dig up their bulbs and replant the following Fall (see below for instructions on that). I am more into survivalist planting. If it can live with me with very little care, then I can live with it. This year, I wanted to get some pretty bulbs to sprout inside my home. All the bulb needs to grow is some water. No dirt is needed, however I’m using small rocks in some containers as I think it’s nicer looking. I’ve learned that the perfect amount is basically the bottom 1/4″ of the bulb. Within several days, small roots come out from the bottom of the bulb to drink up the water. I do change or fill the water frequently to make sure my bulbs don’t sit in murky non-oxygenated water.

I find that the EASIEST ones to sprout in the home are Paper Whites and bonus: they smell AMAZING. You may find them at your local garden shop this time of year, or you can order them online.  I would opt for the largest ones possible (Amazon has 10 large Paper White Bulbs for $15) and then bunch 2 or 3 in a glass container for sprouting. Remember to put the roots side down when putting rocks around the base. You should see the green leaf sprouting within a week or so after adding water.

I have some bulbs in old Bath & Body glass candle containers that I’ve cleaned out (instructions here). I think these will make sweet Valentine’s gifts! Mixing the bulbs with other earthy items like succulents and shells make the arrangement a bit more interesting.

Want to save your bulbs and replant the following year?

When the foliage yellows and dies, empty the bulbs from the pots and dry completely. Husk off the existing foliage, and store in a cool, dry, well ventilated spot until it’s time to replant them in the garden in the fall. Although they may not bloom the following year, with luck and good care they’ll bounce back from their life in confinement and bloom again in future years.

 


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